Last Movie You Watched

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Postby TehDonutKing » Mon Nov 09, 2015 12:39 pm

View Original Postmovieartman wrote:- Sandra should have gotten naked on screen, by god!, Just her in her Bikini was better than some of the series other nude scenes.

What's even the point of fanservice or titillation in horror movies? You know that the character will probably die anyway, and it seldom adds anything to the narrative, so there's usually no way to get enjoyment out of it unless you're into necrophilia.
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Postby movieartman » Mon Nov 09, 2015 6:35 pm

MARGIN CALL (2011)
- Utterly fantastic Financial film.
- Entire cast was perfect, even Simon Baker who some people hate.
- Very unbiased look at money and businesses it's not portraying them as greedy crush the poor with glee monsters, it's people doing their jobs and working themselves thru a bad situation that will begin somewhere regardless of what they do, so if it must start with them so that they have a chance to survive so be it.

THE DAY AFTER TOMORROW (2004)
- This one really took me by surprise, was not half as bad as I was lead to believe.
- Build up to the tornados sequence was well done.
- Few lines of dialogue actually made my skin crawl.
- Whole cast is OK to good.
- I like that they didn't draw out the rivalry crap between jake G and the rich kid.
- Effects are pretty strong for a 2004 film.
- Sets in particular especially once snow starts over taking everything is great.

View Original PostTehDonutKing wrote:What's even the point of fanservice or titillation in horror movies? You know that the character will probably die anyway, and it seldom adds anything to the narrative, so there's usually no way to get enjoyment out of it unless you're into necrophilia.

It's a pleasing visual asthetic for that moment and scene, nothing more. And sometimes it adds to the likability of the character.
How does them eventually dying have anything to with them being pleasing to look at for whatever scene that they are getting nude in?

I personally am not one who goes into Slashers for the kills all that much, I go for suspense and atmosphere.
I like character or mystery driven Slashers like the Scream films tipically. I need to go back and watch more of the old Italian Galio films, most of which were very heavy on Mystery so far as I have heard.
Last edited by movieartman on Mon Nov 09, 2015 6:56 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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Postby TehDonutKing » Mon Nov 09, 2015 6:52 pm

View Original Postmovieartman wrote:How does them eventually dying have anything to with them being pleasing to look at for whatever scene that they are getting nude in?

Because it removes any enjoyability from the kill or the nude scene.
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Postby movieartman » Mon Nov 09, 2015 6:58 pm

View Original PostTehDonutKing wrote:Because it removes any enjoyability from the kill or the nude scene.

Fair enough.
The character eventually dying doesn't play into it at all for me personally.

Now when they have them get killed during a sex scene like part 2 does actual have then yes I will agree the mix can be in bad taste, it depends on the execution.

Edit- better example, the scene in the 2007 Halloween where Myers beats Annie nearly to death while she is topless was a vile ugly bullshit scene.
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Postby Kazuki_Fuse » Mon Nov 09, 2015 11:13 pm

I've actually really liked all of Zombie's films, the Halloween remakes were on point and The Devil's Rejects is fantastic. Only Lords of Salem has fallen flat for me so far.
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Postby Chuckman » Mon Nov 09, 2015 11:31 pm

I've watched 1000 Corpses, Devil's Rejects, and both of Zombie's Halloweens. They all have the same thing in common: I have to work too hard to follow what the fuck is going on, who the characters are, what they're doing, why they're doing it, and what their goals are.

They all feel really long, too. Zombie is the post-LOTR Peter Jackson of horror films.

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Postby movieartman » Mon Nov 09, 2015 11:51 pm

View Original PostKazuki_Fuse wrote:I've actually really liked all of Zombie's films, the Halloween remakes were on point and The Devil's Rejects is fantastic. Only Lords of Salem has fallen flat for me so far.

Agreed in part.
I think The Devils rejects outside of the stuff in the hotel is fantastic.
The stuff with the Sheriff is great.

I "like" his Halloween films, but I really prefer the short silent shadow like Phantom of the originals to the giant grunting redneck hobo of Zombies.

Harris and Douriff are really great in both films.
Malcom MacDowell is good in the first, however they made him too much of jerk in the 2nd.
The hospital dream in 2 was a freaking fantastic remake of the original Halloween 2.
What I would have done was have that Opening be for real, have Laurie and Annie both be killed in the hospital and the rest of the film be about Sheriff Brackett seeking vengeance. That may have ended up being too much of a retread of devils rejects but at the same time I think it would have made for a much better full film than what we got.

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Postby Gendo'sPapa » Tue Nov 10, 2015 4:07 am

Rob Zombie is very much an auteur. His movies are identifiably his & they're complete visions.

But, personally I hate all his films. There's only so much "white trailer trash loudly calling each other fucknuts in screeching yells" that I can take.

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Postby robersora » Tue Nov 10, 2015 4:44 am

Yesterday we've watched He Loves Me... He Loves Me Not. Despite its title, it's quite the interesting movie. Also, we've watched Cruel Intentions - oh the melancholia - this movie was one of my childhood movies alongside The Lion King, Romeo + Juliet... (my sister's taste was a big influence, yes.)
Yeah, I still love this modern take on turn of the century London tragedies. :nyao:
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Postby Trajan » Tue Nov 10, 2015 1:30 pm

Saw Alfred Hitchcock's The 39 Steps yesterday. This is another one of those movies that took me a second watch to really "get" and I enjoyed it much more the second time around. The scenery of the Scottish moors and highlands was really amazing and I was able to follow the plot better this time around. It's sort of fun to realize how much Hitchcock barrows from this film for North by Northwest made 25 years later, one of my favorite films of all time.
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Postby Bagheera » Sun Nov 15, 2015 9:46 pm

Just finished Immortal (Ad Vitam). That was some weird-ass shit right there. I liked it, but that's about as weird as weird gets. Best scene in the film: Bast and Anubis playing Monopoly.

Also, Horus is an asshole, but pantheonic gods tend to be such.
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Postby TehDonutKing » Fri Nov 27, 2015 12:58 am

Not exactly a full movie, but i saw a single scene from the new Vacation, and it reaffirmed my belief that American comedy films are total shit and should be euthanized inhumanely as possible. It's like they tried even less than they did with the Christmas one, and that had some of the laziest attempts at jokes i've ever seen in a big budget film. Holy fuck, how do people sit through this?
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Postby Gus Hanson » Fri Nov 27, 2015 3:02 pm

Not from the beginning but i watched Neighbors (2014) again to prepare for when i go see Dirty Grandpa next year. The EfronMan gave some good chuckles here and there and i feel like Ike Barinholtz was totally underused since he was basically the third wheel to Seth Rogen and Rose Byrne's team trying to get back at the frat. There are some characters i could've done without such as the Dean, the unsympathetic doctor with the unfunny joke, the sarcastic real estate agent, by God that's pretty much all the unfunny cameos. No wonder the movie falls flat a bit in those parts. :rolleyes:

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Postby soul.assassin » Sat Nov 28, 2015 2:44 pm

After the four-hour epic that was Love Exposure, ate it up to the end, I looked into this from Sono and...

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Postby Chuckman » Sun Nov 29, 2015 4:04 pm

Last movie I saw was Gods and Kings. I only barely paid attention and it had a hobbit-like effect on me. I found it strange that the movie has absolutely no grandeur. It's weird because Ridley Scott has made some huge feeling movies. The Robin Hood one felt the same way.

It felt... made for TV. It doesn't holdup to Cecil B. DeMille's work at all.

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Postby unz » Sun Nov 29, 2015 5:30 pm

View Original PostTehDonutKing wrote:Not exactly a full movie, but i saw a single scene from the new Vacation, and it reaffirmed my belief that American comedy films are total shit and should be euthanized inhumanely as possible. It's like they tried even less than they did with the Christmas one, and that had some of the laziest attempts at jokes i've ever seen in a big budget film. Holy fuck, how do people sit through this?


Not familiar with the movie above but if you want something "the old way" you can go places.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3FOzD4Sfgag

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Postby Blue Monday » Tue Dec 01, 2015 10:42 am

Great Bodhisattva Pass [大菩薩峠] AKA The Sword of Doom (1966)

    "The sword is the soul. Study the soul to know the sword. Evil mind, evil sword."
I love it when a movie comes along - one you know absolutely nothing about, nor have heard of before - and completely knocks your socks off. While I like to think I've seen my fair share of chambara and jidaigeki flicks, I confess I was unaware of Great Bodhisattva Pass. Now having watched it and subsequently read up on its history, I now know it is something of a well-known legend in samurai cinema and literature. I’m sure others here would’ve most likely seen it already.

Based on one of the longest serial novels in Japan by Kaizan Nakazato (41 volumes encompassing 1,533 chapters and over 5,700,000 million Japanese characters), Great Bodhisattva Pass is about the seemingly “evil” swordsman Ryunosuke Tsukue, played by Tatsuya Nakadai, and his descent into insanity. The movie starts with Ryunosuke, not yet revealed to the audience, murdering an old Buddhist pilgrim praying for death atop a mountain pass (the titular pass in fact). The scene is horrifying yet visually stunning and sets the tone for the rest of the film.

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From here we follow successive key moments in Ryunosuke’s life. The day after the murder of the old man, he is scheduled for a bout at a triannual tournament. His opponent is Bunnojo Utsugi, star pupil of the Kogen Ittō-ryū; the school Ryunosuke was formerly associated with, expelled for ungiven reasons within the confines of the narrative. However, on the evening before the tournament, Utsugi’s fiancé, Hama, calls on Ryunosuke at his residence. She pleads with him to throw the fight, such is Ryunosuke’s reputation with the sword and his infamous, eerie “silent form” style. At first Ryunosuke declines.

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Hama, though, continues to beg. If Utsugi loses the bout, he will lose the favour of the Kogen Ittō-ryū and also a tentative position as fencing instructor for the local lord, potentially leaving their family destitute. Ryunosuke is attracted to Hama. He agrees to throw the fight if she will sleep with him. Hama begrudgingly accepts this condition for the sake of her husband-to-be. Come the tournament; it is revealed Utsugi had Hama followed and knows what she did with Ryunosuke. He divorces her and intends to kill Ryunosuke in their match.

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We now first witness Ryunosuke Tsukue’s odd fencing style. His “silent form” is adapting a lax guard, slowly lowering his blade, taunting his opponent to strike. Unwavering, he never makes the first move; Ryunosuke always counters his enemy’s attack. In the match, Ryunosuke senses Utsugi’s murderous intent. Just as the bout is declared a draw due to inaction, Bunnojo fouls by stabbing at Tsukue. The attack is countered with a single strike to the head. Ryunosuke kills Bunnojo. This, of course, causes major uproar.

Ryunosuke leaves. On his way home, Hama approaches him, warning that clansmen and pupils of the Kogen Ittō-ryū have set an ambush in retaliation. Ryunosuke seems to bristle as this prospect, ignoring Hama’s pleas of eloping with her. The trap is sprung and in a beautifully choreographed fight (seriously, check out video on Youtube. There are even really cool GIFs via Google Images), Ryunosuke leaves some 12 men dead without breaking a sweat. Now wanted for murder, Tsukue abandons his life and flees with Hama to Edo.

The story moves three years forward in time. Ryunosuke now lives in Edo with Hama and their infant son under the alias Ryutaro Yoshida. He scrapes by serving as a swordsman for the Shinchōgumi (Edo branch or precursor to the Shinsengumi) chiefly as an assassin. I don’t want to spoil things or go into too much detail, but here the film slows down and we get to see a bit of Ryunosuke and Hama’s day-to-day. We also get to see the stories of Matsu; the orphan granddaughter of the old pilgrim from the beginning, Shinchibei; the thief who saved and adopted Matsu, and Hyoma; Bunnojo Utsugi’s younger brother who is training to one day get revenge on Ryunosuke Tsukue.

All throughout, Ryunosuke’s face is a fixed expression of detached observation, glassy eyes suggesting and unknowable disquiet. Tatsuya Nakadai's portrayal of Ryunosuke, along with the exquisite camera work and soundtrack, help instil a sense of dread and foreboding in the viewer, something which continues to build into a fever pitch. It’s then we come to the turning point of the movie.

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During a botched assassination, Ryunosuke is witness to another master swordsman. Numerous Shinchōgumi men are cut down effortlessly by Toranosuke Shimada, played by Toshiro Mifune in what is the most perfect casting and ultimately an incredibly bad-arse and glorified cameo. Shimada seems to be something of a foil to Ryunosuke, not only in his fencing style - which is more orthodox and perhaps more iconic in a classical sense within samurai cinema - but in his world view and outlook, clearly pained by having been forced to kill so many to defend himself.

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Ryunosuke is so shocked by this display that he is frozen with doubt and uncertainty. Up until now it is apparent he thought he was peerless when it came to the sword. This is the first in a chain of events that serves to unhinge Ryunosuke’s grasp on reality, Shimada’s words echoing within him: “Evil mind, evil sword.”

From here, we get a descent arc. Again, I don’t want to get too generous with the spoilers but the movie culminates into its climax: Ryunosuke’s mind seems to finally snap and we get a bloody eight minute plus fight at the conclusion. The body count is through the roof ridiculous, and I think the final shot is my favourite out of the entire movie.

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The movie ends on a cliff-hanger, a freeze-frame. Ryunosuke cutting and cutting, endlessly, wounded and bloodied almost beyond a doubt of his fate. What appears on the surface to be an exercise in nihilism and absurdist violence is in fact an examination of the world and the people in it. Let me expound on that latter point.

Having watched the movie and taking the ending into consideration, the obvious conclusion is that Ryunosuke is an incarnation or embodiment of evil. So long as there is evil in the world, our “anti-hero” will keep on going, killing and killing. Just look at the freeze-frame above. “The end,” the massive kanji reads stamped, Ryunosuke still, caught in mid-swing. This seems to be the common hypothesis I've seen looking at other analyses for this film.

However, I mentioned I've read into the background of the story. Turns out Great Bodhisattva Pass, directed by Kihachi Okamoto which I should have mentioned sooner, was only the first in an intended trilogy that never came about. In fact, Great Bodhisattva Pass only covers the first three books in what is a 41 volume series which is itself unfinished, due to the author passing away not having given it an ending.

Turns out though that Ryunosuke survives that impossible fight, which of course he would because “evil is unending” if you want to pursue that train of thought. I don’t know much about the rest of the story of Kaizan Nakazato’s novel, but what I can gather from what little I can find – primarily a translated synopses PDF from some US college course on Japanese literature – Ryunosuke lives on. He eventually switches side to support the Imperial faction, takes another lover who meets an untimely end, ages, loses his vision and goes blind. The story follows other main characters for a few years (Hyoma Utsugi, and a dwarfish spearman apparently, just to name a couple), checks in with Ryunosuke from time to time, who eventually floats out of sight on the roof of a house in a flood as mad as a hatter.

It seems Okamoto’s movie achieves what the novel has left us with anyway. A cliffhanger. A “to be continued” never to be continued. Ryunosuke fighting on, perhaps eternally.

Getting back to my point I brought up though: My read isn't that Ryunosuke is an embodiment of evil or some such, but that he is in fact a mirror, reflecting the world around him back outwardly. Take, for example, his silent form as a microcosm; he never strikes nor acts first, only ever retaliates those who attack him. Even as his work as an assassin, “the victims” always cut at him first. It’s his circumstances, the world after all, that has put him into this line of work. The only truly ambiguous act is the murder of the old man at the start. But the old man was praying for death. The mirror simply gave what was requested. An amoral man; the mirror. Even his treatment of Hama is due to the insinuation that she lusts for him first.

That’s my theory anyway, and I think it’s a stroke of genius how Ryunosuke’s sword style matches up with this process. Great Bodhisattva Pass is an examination of the bloodthirsty world and people of the time via Ryunosuke as a mirror, reflecting everything around him; he is the world around him.

I highly recommend Great Bodhisattva Pass. The direction and cinematography are superb and Tatsuya Nakadai is sublime as the main character. I don’t usually do this kind of thing for movies but this one was worth it. Definitely entering my canon of top films.
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Re: Last Movie You Watched

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Postby Gus Hanson » Mon Dec 07, 2015 5:10 pm

Dragon Ball Z: Battle of Gods *Uncut*

After so many attempts at watching it completely and failing, last night i succeeded. Animation-wise, the 3D blends well only sometimes since the city and the area around Capsule Corp. comes off as outdated. The 2D character designs are still top notch. Story elements are very amusing lots of points even if the added scenes sometimes drag. The one bit that caught me by suprise was the Trunks/Mai shipping since before the full viewing last night, i had made it to the intro of Pilaf and company. As for the English dub, superb as always. One thing i did not like about Goku and his naivete was it made him come off as cocky in a few angles like him disliking the Super Saiyan God power up because of all it took to get it and not having a scene of him just accepting his limits as well as bumbling King Kai's warnings of taking the threat seriously. Other than that, the movie is in good shape and i can't wait to see the one following it.
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Postby Gob Hobblin » Tue Dec 08, 2015 11:14 pm

John Wick: hands down, one of my all-time favorite films.
Though, Gob still might look good in a cocktail dress.
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Postby A.T. Fish » Wed Dec 09, 2015 9:02 am

Yesterday I watched Compliance. It was an interesting movie but with an absurdly stupid plot, and then I found out it was based on a true story, all of it, not even the worse parts were fabricated.
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