[Literature] Currently Reading (discussion)

Yeah. You read right. This is for everything that doesn't have anything to do with Eva.

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Postby drinian » Wed Mar 31, 2010 1:18 am

Reading William Gibson's Neuromancer. The Panthers remind me a lot of 4chan.

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Postby zlink64 » Wed Mar 31, 2010 2:55 pm

Been reading a lot edger alan poe (1 big book that has a whole bunch of his stories/poems in it). Started out as assign reading for my english class but I've gotten really into it. Some of his stuff is crap IMO but some of his stuff is really good too. Also started reading Blaze by stephenking but put it down before finishing. Thought it was boring. Might start reading catcher in the ryhe since my lil bro is recomending it to me but I dont trust his opinions.
hmmm
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Postby Enki v.2 » Sat Apr 03, 2010 3:11 pm

View Original PostLucretius wrote:Reading Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep for an English class, of all things. Interesting plot, eye-rapingly bad prose, which is pretty much what you'd expect from novels of this sort.


That's pretty standard for PKD. However, out of all his books I've read, the prose in that one is the worst.

Apparently it's a side effect of writing all your books on speed (which is what he did up until A Scanner Darkly -- probably one of the most readable of his I've read).

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Postby The Imperialist » Sat Apr 03, 2010 4:54 pm

Under the Loving Care of the Fatherly Leader- Bradely Martin

THE definitive book on North Korea, if one is to look at the history of it and why the country which used to have a better economy than S. Korea then decended into the state it is in today.
Also a very informative portryal of the persoality cult surrounding the Kim family, corruption and diplomatic brinksmanship.
I feel old

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Postby ran1 » Sat Apr 03, 2010 4:59 pm

The Imperialist wrote:decended


Oh, you.
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Postby Lucretius » Sat Apr 03, 2010 10:34 pm

Trying to finish The Sorrows of Young Werther auf Deutsch before the end of the semester and wondering where my life went wrong. ( my German sucks)

He shuddered a bit, remembering the somewhat creepy level of detail Kaji had gone into, while rubbing a watermelon in a disturbingly sexual way.

Life is a continuous nut-kicking contest where your turn comes last if ever. -majlund

Proud supporter of Shinji x Sachiel

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Postby The Imperialist » Sun Apr 04, 2010 4:39 am

@ran1: Oh how I wish I could have done it. And on top of that, S. Korea, PRC, and the rest of the world that bares teeth against my homeland.

Update (06/04)
Liberal Fascism (Jonah Goldberg): Intersting look on how the modern 'liberalism' have actually taken on fascistic characteristics, or actually share the same root (with not much difference except one is more sinister, and one is more acceptable- which I do disagree but.). HOWEVER, this book sounded more like a rant, and the fact that he forgot to criticise the continual drag on of the so called 'conservatives' to emotional politics, not just 'liberals'. And the fact that fascist progressivism is not social rationalisation. It is simply the eradication of the individual (which he does point out is what modern 'liberalism' is which I wholly agree)
I feel old

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Postby MugwumpHasNoLiver » Tue Apr 06, 2010 8:59 pm

Bah, I now officially and un-ironically like Ayn Rand. Which means nothing to any of you, because I'm sure you asll just assumed I was one of her mad zealots the entire time.

The Fountainhead was really good, not quite great, but it contained moments of such contempt, that I resonated with so fully, it more than compensated for a few instances of bad prose and about a hundred pages where nothing happened besides a corrupt newspaper tycoon talking about his feelings. I was so fascinated by Toohey that I was actually waiting for his big 'ooh look at how evil I am' speech. And then something I never expected happened, and that was that I was moved to tears by the sheer force of idealism. I teared up unexpectedly during two points in the fountainhead, first during that gay kid on a bike scene and again during the beginning of Roark's trial speech.

Then something more unexpected happened this morning, when I read Anthem and teared up some more during the end. Ugh. You can all call her dull, and heavy-handed, but I think she's a very charismatic and powerful writer. Not a particularly good stylist, but she says what she wants to say, very, very, very clearly and does it pretty damn well.

Now none of you have to worry, I'm not going to become a raging Objectivist, and in all honestly, I'm still pretty sick of shopping Rand's face on things, because as much as I can relate and am elated by Rand's idealistic view of the individual . . . well that's it, I just think its too idealistic. I don't think it will ever be anything more than a pipe fream, a fantasy. And no, I don't consider myself a Howard Roark, I'll never in a million years have that kind of blind, uncompromising determination. Hell, I'd only call myself a Steven Mallory if I was being generous. I suppose reading her work just wants to make me be the best I can possibly be.

I've just started We the Living because I don't have the balls to go into Atlas Shrugged yet. I'll probably read a few shorter non-Rand books before taking on that particularly paperweight.
"Now, from Nature we obtain abundant information about ourselves, and precious little about others. About the woman you clasp in your arms, can you say with certainty that she does not feign pleasure? About the woman you mistreat, are you quite sure that from abuse she does not derive some obscure and lascivious satisfaction? Let us confine ourselves to simple evidence: through thoughtfulness, gentleness, concern for the feelings of others we saddle our own pleasure with restrictions, and make this sacrifice to obtain a doubtful result." -The Divine Marquis

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Postby schismatics » Tue Apr 06, 2010 9:03 pm

This thread reminds me that I need finish Dracula...man I've been reading that on and off for the past 2 or 3 months...I'm so lazy...

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Postby Eva Yojimbo » Tue Apr 06, 2010 9:34 pm

After watching Wenders' Wrong Move and finding out it was based on Goethe's Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship I vaguely remembered reading and loving that book in school. I've thought about checking out Goethe in general for a long while and may decide to delve in soon. I'll probably read Faust first for obvious reasons.
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I've seen so many changeful years, / to Earth I am a stranger grown: / I wander in the ways of men, / alike unknowing and unknown: / Unheard, unpitied, unrelieved, / I bear alone my load of care; / For silent, low, on beds of dust, / Lie all that would my sorrows share. - Robert Burns' Lament for James

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Postby Merridian » Fri Apr 09, 2010 1:11 am

been reading the Tanakh as the primary source for one of my classes, but I've also been rereading a lot of it independently. Most of it is pretty damn badass, and the interwoven connectivity, intentional or not, really comes through in additional readings.

but more importantly, I just finished reading Naoki Urasawa's 20th/21st Century Boys. Holy god i haven't seen so much multi-layered symbolism packed into a finale since EoE (might not be to same extreme, but 20CB is still pretty heavy on the symbolism). Incredible work. Unbelievable work. It worked on multiple levels, with multiple facets for entertainment and intrigue. This is definitely standing next to Akira as one of the best manga I've ever read (which admittedly, isn't saying much cuz I haven't read that much manga, but still...). Hell, like Akira, it easily stands next to some of my favorite western comics as well... Meticulous artwork, meticulous writing, meticulous layout, lovable & thoroughly developed characters... gahhhh jezus this was unbelievable

and the primary reason i haven't been getting as much sleep as i should. so on that note, i'm going to bed.

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Postby alabaster » Fri Apr 09, 2010 8:03 am

Reading Bradbury's "Martian Chronicles". He's one of my favorite writers.
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Postby Xard » Fri Apr 09, 2010 10:27 am

View Original PostMerridian wrote:but more importantly, I just finished reading Naoki Urasawa's 20th/21st Century Boys. Holy god i haven't seen so much multi-layered symbolism packed into a finale since EoE (might not be to same extreme, but 20CB is still pretty heavy on the symbolism). Incredible work. Unbelievable work. It worked on multiple levels, with multiple facets for entertainment and intrigue. This is definitely standing next to Akira as one of the best manga I've ever read (which admittedly, isn't saying much cuz I haven't read that much manga, but still...). Hell, like Akira, it easily stands next to some of my favorite western comics as well... Meticulous artwork, meticulous writing, meticulous layout, lovable & thoroughly developed characters... gahhhh jezus this was unbelievable


I don't know much about "multi-layered symbolism" in finale but other than that

:nod: :nod: :nod: :nod: :nod: :nod: :nod: :nod: :nod:

View Original PostMerridian wrote:and the primary reason i haven't been getting as much sleep as i should. so on that note, i'm going to bed.


At least you didn't marathon whole fucking thing in span of two days and nights like I did... :lol:

Final chapter is such a perfect ending note...so touching bawwww ;____;

Kenji fuck yeah :smokin: :smokin: :smokin: :smokin: :smokin:
ran1: Oh gosh this sentence gave me an internet boner. You're so tsundere.
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And don't forget to wear the Ran mask.
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Gob Hobblin: Sanctimonious, subtly racist, vaguely misogynist, somehow says something while at the same time saying...nothing, really, at all....

Nice, Xard. That's nice.

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Postby Captain_Morgan » Fri Apr 09, 2010 6:52 pm

Terry Prachett and Neil Gaiman's Good Omens

The Apocalypse has never been funnier.

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Postby Merridian » Fri Apr 09, 2010 10:13 pm

Xard wrote: I don't know much about "multi-layered symbolism" in finale
:cringe: seriously? I can’t be the only person that saw him bringing together all the themes of nostalgia, childhood’s end, ‘childhood games’ vs ‘adulthood reality’, typical safety in the norm/repetition vs escapist yearn for outlandish adventure, etc etc etc into that final showdown with the giant robot trying to crush the secret base at the end. And that was on top of the ‘copy of a copy’ idea since the “secret base” was just a fake replica built in a fake replica amusement park town. There is a LOT that Urasawa brings to the table with 20CB, and he weaves these themes into the work so masterfully that a loldeep analysis/interpretation isn’t even necessary. The story is outstanding on its own. TBH I feel kinda bad overcomplicating matters with all this pretentious shit, but I just can't help it sometimes...

But my point was that he basically summed up all the themes that 20CB tackled in that final showdown between its setting (the fake town), the devices involved (giant robot, secret base), the characters, how the events unfolded, and how they were presented.

And so, because of the prolonged orgasm that was 20CB, I’ve looked into Urasawa’s 8-vol long Pluto. Awesome stuff. I, Robot meets Bladerunner combined with Astro Boy and filtered through Urasawa’s unique look and style.

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Postby Eva Yojimbo » Sat Apr 10, 2010 10:00 pm

Started Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre yesterday and I really love it so far. In fact, I seem to have an affinity for stories about very introverted, lonely children. Austen's Mansfield Park is my favorite from her, eg.

View Original PostMerridian wrote:but more importantly, I just finished reading Naoki Urasawa's 20th/21st Century Boys.
I might've already asked, but... where can I read this?
Cinelogue & Forced Perspective Cinema
^ Writing as Jonathan Henderson ^
We're all adrift on the stormy seas of Evangelion, desperately trying to gather what flotsam can be snatched from the gale into a somewhat seaworthy interpretation so that we can at last reach the shores of reason and respite. - ObsessiveMathsFreak
Jimbo has posted enough to be considered greater than or equal to everyone, and or synonymous with the concept of 'everyone'. - Muggy
I've seen so many changeful years, / to Earth I am a stranger grown: / I wander in the ways of men, / alike unknowing and unknown: / Unheard, unpitied, unrelieved, / I bear alone my load of care; / For silent, low, on beds of dust, / Lie all that would my sorrows share. - Robert Burns' Lament for James

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Postby ran1 » Sun Apr 11, 2010 12:23 pm

After reading some pop literature reccommended by a friend and Mary Shelley's Frankenstein for my literature class, C.S. Lewis for my theology class and some Asimov to see if pulp Science Fiction could possibly redeem itself, I've come to the realization that for the most part, I don't like 99% literary fiction, and moreover, I can't stand it when the majority of philosophers attempt to write like pretentious douchebags. I mean, yes, Sartre, I know what you mean by the Hegel reference, but goddamn, the gereral reader doesn't. WTF kind of proleteriat writing is this? You're supposed to be in line with Marxism! And don't even get me started on C.S. Lewis and his overt and digressive moralizing. And the fucking romantics and their tendency to turn what could've been an awesome short story into an utterly awful novel. WTF.

So, in response, I've decided to limit myself to reading the work of these authors before I feel good enough to jump into literature as a whole again:

Fiction
-Ernest Hemingway
-Haruki Murakami
-Vladimir Nakobov
-Anton Chekov
-Kurt Vonnegut
-Leo Tolstoy
and
[Japanese Haiku Poetry]

Philosophy/Psychology/Cultural Theory
-Slavoj Zizek
-Erich Fromm
-Lao Tzu
-Soren Kierkegaard
-Maybe some Derrida
[Scheduled Reading of Communist Manifesto over summer break, but no other Marx readings for some time]
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Ran's persistent irony is a coping mechanism he uses to try and create some understanding of his paradoxical attraction to and disgust of the elitist bourgeois slaughterhouse in which he's forever trapped. --Muggy

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Postby planet news » Sun Apr 11, 2010 2:15 pm

Mostly foreign. Translation doesn't both you then? Also, the Communist Manifesto takes like 2 hours while Das Kapital is like the longest thing ever written.
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Postby ran1 » Sun Apr 11, 2010 4:38 pm

planet news wrote:Mostly foreign. Translation

>Nakobov, Vonnegut, Hemingway
>Foreign

wut.

Anyway, in regard to the Russians: Both Tolstoy and Chekov have been painstakingly and expertly translated a million times over. I have no issues with the translation because those two are some of the best I've read regardless of language.

Murakami's translations are okay, not the best I've seen, but passable. Content makes up for it.

Zizek, Kiekegaard, Marx, Derrida, Fromm I do not read for literary merits.
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Every post in Evageeks automaticaly becomes masturbatory material. It's nothing new. ~Justcrazyguy
Ran's persistent irony is a coping mechanism he uses to try and create some understanding of his paradoxical attraction to and disgust of the elitist bourgeois slaughterhouse in which he's forever trapped. --Muggy

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Postby MugwumpHasNoLiver » Sun Apr 11, 2010 5:50 pm

Damn commies, always bitching about bourgeois prejudices, I swear if you guys didn't have such a bitchin' flag, I would probably just complain more. Anyway, I thought I would be tired of Rand now, but guess what? I'M NOT! I'm reading her first novel, the one about Russia, We The Living, and despite showing the horrors of your precious Dictatorship of the Proletariat, the plot is a simple love triangle. I also find it a tad bit ironic that Kira is pretending to be in love with a commie in order to get money to save the man she really loves, who is of, *gasp* bourgeois descent! Aren't you sort of unintentionally illustrating the class exploitation that the Reds are always bitching about? But there is the point, which is made very clear, than men of his social origin are discriminated against, there's this long section that's nothing but job rejections. Is this supposed to be a metaphor? I don't know. It's not bad, but Anthem and The Fountainhead are better, and will remain so unless this picks up during the second half. Really it just makes me want to dive right into Atlas Shrugged instead of taking a break afterward.
"Now, from Nature we obtain abundant information about ourselves, and precious little about others. About the woman you clasp in your arms, can you say with certainty that she does not feign pleasure? About the woman you mistreat, are you quite sure that from abuse she does not derive some obscure and lascivious satisfaction? Let us confine ourselves to simple evidence: through thoughtfulness, gentleness, concern for the feelings of others we saddle our own pleasure with restrictions, and make this sacrifice to obtain a doubtful result." -The Divine Marquis

"I agree Hans, but we have talked about those anal fisting analogies." -Werner Herzog


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