[Film] Most satisfying movie you have seen recently [2]

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Postby Bomby von Bombsville » Fri Feb 26, 2010 2:01 am

I actually kind of liked Robocop. Not sure if I made that clear in my blurb.

Meanwhile, I have a bone to pick. Spoilerized for being a novel. Also, for containing actual spoilers, not that any of you were planning on seeing this film anyway.
SPOILER: Show
The Classic (Cock Jae-Yong)
I think there's something severely wrong with my psychology. I feel that I've entered a hypomanic episode, which isn't necessarily a bad thing. Hypomanic episodes tend to come along with strong creative energy and a generally good mood.

Yet, it's also going to be spring soon. Spring it the time for falling in love. Hell, it's not even spring yet, and I'm already in the mood for love. Just the anticipation makes me want to grab the nearest cute girl with dark hair and high cheekbones and shower her with attention. I'm also about to gradate, so it's probably not a good idea since I'll be splitting from this university pretty soon.

So what's the effect all this has on me? I'm becoming attracted to melodramatic things. Lately, I've been listening to a lot of Teresa Teng songs, especially the stunningly gorgeous "The Moon Represents My Heart," which probably doesn't mean shit to you if you aren't Chinese. Although I'm not Chinese but it does mean shit to me lately. The point is, at any other time in my life I'd probably just consider the song cheesy.

I'm a sucker for a good romantic story in any mood, but generally I stick to the artsier stuff. This is probably why I shower Wong Kar-Wai with more acclaim than most people do, minus that Blueberry Nights crap, because that was a steaming pile of disappointment. But when I really get in that mood, I have this bad tendency to keep running back to the cruel, manipulative arms of some film director named Kwak Jae-Yong, a 500-year-old wishy-washy pervert whose sole purpose in life is to torture his audience.

I'm not quite sure what the best metaphor for a Kwak film is. On one hand, they're like the one cheerleader you knew in high school that you actually got along with. If you're a hipster douchebag like me, you should know that cheerleaders are totally not your type at all, yet you find yourself strangely liking this girl. Eventually, you fall for her, and for a while you enjoy that sensation of being young and in love. Eventually, you realize that, despite the fact that she's different from the other cheerleaders, she's just exactly like them. And then, bam! She's pregnant by the quarterback of the football team. You should've known it was going to happen, but you fell for the silly little girl anyway.

No, maybe Kwak's films are more like drugs. At first, you get high. Then, the drug wears off and you feel worse than you did before, but you keep coming back for more.

Okay, enough with the cliche comparisons. Kwak Jae-Yong's films are essentially shaggy dog stories. Bait-and-switch films. Since I'm pretty sure that none of you actually want to watch The Classic, I'll tell you the entire plot, twists and all:

You know it's a Kwak Jae-Yong film because it starts with god-fucking-awful "Canon in D." So there's a girl. And there's her best friend. And there's the guy that her best friend has a crush on, whom she also secretly has feelings for. Girl has requisite cuteness and ability to cry on demand for the "classic" Korean melodrama. Then there's the story of her mom (Joo-Hee) and dad and their hypotenuse (named Joon-Ha and Tae-Soo, but not necessarily in that order), which she relates to us by reading letters exchanged between the three of them.

Before I get into diatribe mode full blast, I will say that there's something very appealing about Kwak's films. There's a certain lightness and nostalgia in his tone, and his sense of blocking and framing is much different than one would expect from a mainstream, audience-friendly film.

So anyway, there's these two stories spanning across these two generations. I won't get into the present day story because it's really not that interesting. Come to think of it, the past story isn't really that much more interesting, either, but I found myself kind of enjoying watching it play out, even though I thought I knew how it was going to end. I mean, Joo-Hee has to end up with Joon-Ha, because Joon-Ha is the present day girl's father, right? And even Tae-Soo wants them to be together, even though he is in love with Joo-Hee and their parents set the two of them up.

AND THEN THERE'S THE MANDATORY KOREAN WAR SCENE!!!

I should've known it was coming but I really thought the film was taking place more recently. I'm not quite sure how the timeline of this film is supposed to work out. So anyway, Joon-Ha has to fight in the Korean War. And there's a battle scene. And a guy gets shot. And then the North Koreans come running and the South has to retreat. But wait! Joon-Ha doesn't have the necklace that Joo-Hee gave him earlier. The guy who got shot has it. So idiot protagonist Joon-Ha runs back to the dead guy to get the necklace, juking and jiving through the commies. And he gets the necklace without getting harmed. He's on his way back to the helicopters, and another guy gets injured. So idiot protagonist Joon-Ha picks up the guy, and somehow they make it back to the retreating place.

And then they get hit with a grenade.

But wait! Joon-Ha actually survived the war, and it cuts to years later, with Joon-Ha and Joo-Hee meeting again for the first time. And all is going to be okay, right?

"Hello Joo-Hee. You're Beautiful. How's Tae-Soo? What? You guys didn't get married? Well, guess what, dear Joo-Hee, whom I've loved for years: I got married a few years ago."

Fuck you, Kwak.

Then Joon-Ha turned around. Joo-Hee says:

"Why are you trying to hide the fact that you're blind?" Joon-Ha falls over a bunch of tables and waiters and shit.

Fuck you, Kwak. Asshole.

THEN, It turns out that Joo-Hee married Tae-Soo and had the little girl who's narrating the story. THEN, it turns out that Joon-Ha didn't get married until after Joo-Hee and Tae-Soo did. THEN, it turns out that Joon-Ha DIED and LEFT A SON BEHIND.

Image

Cut to present day story, and you'll never guess who the guy that the main character is in love with is.

Image

I guess I have to admit, that last part actually might have made the ending less of a work of manipulative cow manure (an item which also has an apt role throughout the film), but it's a totally fucking cop out of an end.

So the question remains: why do I keep watching films by Kwak Jae-Yong when I know very well that no matter how appealing they might be in the beginning, the last 30 minutes are going to piss me off? Couldn't I be better spending my time just re-watching Wong Kar-Wai's films or Before Sunrise/Sunset?

I don't know, but what worries me is that somewhere along the line I might have actually financially supported Kwak Jae-Yong, contributing to his mostly undeserved international success. He knows this, too, and just to rub it in my face, he took a picture of himself with Haruka Ayase:

Image
"Thank you for your financial support! She's cute, isn't she?"
And to think, I could've been watching Kim Yu-Na pwn the Olympics instead...
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Postby Eva Yojimbo » Fri Feb 26, 2010 9:23 pm

:hitthetable: That was an awesome write-up, Bomby! I've never heard of Kwak or his films but if they're half as amusing as your review I may see one in spite of everything!

Repulsion [1965; Roman Polanski; 104 min; UK]

8.0/10
SPOILER: Show
One of the most disturbing psychological thrillers ever, what's remarkable about Repulsion is that it was originally meant to be a B-horror film with cheap scares. It was produced by a company that had previously only worked in exploitation films and had hired Polanski to bring a bit of class and respectability to their company. However, they had no idea HOW much class Roman would bring to the production as it went over budget and over time almost immediately, though in the end the producers told Polanski they'd ordered a Mini Cooper and he'd delivered a Rolls Royce. Repulsion is a film about a young woman named Carol, played superbly by Catherine Deneuve, who lives with her sister in a small UK apartment and works a day job at a beauty salon. But Carol seems to have a penchant for daydreaming. When her sister goes on a trip with her boyfriend, Carol is left all alone in the apartment and her fantasies turn into schizophrenia as she envisions the walls cracking, a serial rapist attacker, and even views the few real people left in her life (such as her potential boyfriend) as dangerous threats.

Much like Knife in the Water, Polanski shows a stunning adeptness at sustaining tension through mood and tone that's never overstated. His use of sound is especially masterful; such as a clock in Carol's room that incessantly ticks. But moreover it's his restraint of when not to use sound. The first rape that Carol envisions is played in silence with the exception of that ticking clock and in combination with the angles and the editing creates a truly disturbing experience. But beyond sound the film greatly benefits from having cinematographer Gilbert Taylor who before Repulsion had worked on Dr. Strangelove. Taylor has a tremendous eye for black and white compositions especially when it comes to dense and sensual shadows. Along with the use of sound it's really Taylor's cinematography that imbues the apartment with a claustrophobic, haunting, otherworldly quality to it. But we can't attribute it all to Taylor's eye, as Polanski's choices of lenses, movement, and long takes attribute a great deal to the film. Especially striking are the scenes later on in which the apartment itself stretches out. Polanski said he had ordered the production designer to build sets that would be modifiable so as to achieve the effect. The elongating of the rooms and corridors, combined with the wide lenses which exaggerate the depth to an even greater degree provides for a startling psychological effect through the physical representation of space.

If I can find negative criticism for the film it's solely in the remnants of some cheap scare tactics and a bit of cold, distance that Polanski maintains between the audience and Carol. Even though so many of the film's chilling thrills are effective they seem somewhat disconnected from a more holistic perspective. As if they were just tacked on because Polanski knew they WOULD be effective. I think it hurts the film more because we never really get much of an insight into Carol as a character. This isn't the fault of Deneuve either who plays her with a wonderful, physical subtlety. In fact, Deneuve spoke broken English and even though her vocal acting isn't top-notch it's her physical presence that sells it. But for some reason we never really feel intimate with her; as if we're joining in on her psychological breakdown from a close perspective. It ends up making the film a bit too much of the typical horror film it was meant to be rather than really playing up the innovative psychological thriller that Polanski intended.

But even with these reservations, Repulsion is still an excellent film; one in which I have almost all positive things to say about. Chilling, thrilling, and constantly visually engaging, Repulsion is one of those films that proves if you give a great director a chance he can turn a b-grade production into grade-a material.
Frankenstein [1931; James Whale; 71 min; US]

9.5/10

Bride of Frankenstein [1935; James Whale; 75 min; US]

9.5/10
SPOILER: Show
In perhaps the best scene in Bill Condon's 1998 film "Gods and Monsters", a film about the last days of director James Whale, we get a montage of various people watching Bride of Frankenstein. Whale's rather innocent and traditional maid finds the film too horrific, gruesome and violent. Whale's assistant, played by Brendon Fraser, watches it as a sad film; one in which the monster just wanted a friend. Fraser's ex-girlfriend in a bar reads the film as a comedy, going as far as to say "can you believe they used to think this was scary?". It's a remarkable scene because it shows the durability of such horror classics, but more-so because it shows the ambiguity of works of genius even in an age where people can't connect to them as being fresh and new. I've probably seen Frankenstein myself 100 times, but never sitting down and consciously watching it from beginning to end. By all sense it should be trite, tired, and pure camp by now. And yet, somehow, it isn't.

It seems to me that the best monsters have something in common with the best superheroes, or even the best religions and mythologies in that they seem to tap into basic human archetypes that are so universal, so simple, yet presented so powerfully that we'd swear we'd never encountered them before. Whale's Frankenstein films are two such creations. It launched Boris Karloff as a horror icon and created the indelible image of the monster himself. But Frankenstein is one of those films in that the rich subtext seems to belie the outward simplicity of the film. Perhaps now the themes of man playing god, reviling his own creation, and then trying to destroy it seem trite now, but I still find a great deal of poignancy and empathy in Whale and Karloff's portrayal. Perhaps it's that childlike innocence beneath the exterior grotesqueness that sells it; something akin to Spielberg's ET. And no matter how many other characters are on screen it is always the monster's show; he's the one we empathize with, he's the one we feel sorrow for, laugh with, and ultimately grieve for when he's ruthlessly killed by his own creators.

Even though Frankenstein could hardly be called a faithful adaptation of the novel, it did seem to be a fairly close adaptation of the stage play based on the novel. Whoever is responsible, it seems clear that Whale decided to put much more of his own personality into Frankenstein's sequel, Bride of Frankenstein, more so than he did in the original. While both contain Whale's directorial taste for German expressionistic and gothic art design, Whale's sense of playful and satirical humor is much more overt in Bride. Bride is, overall, a much more dynamic and multi-faceted film than its original; even while the original is more intimate and frightening. For its early humor, it's astounding that Bride also has the most poignant moment in either film when the monster meets the blind man. After suffering the torture, anger, and fear of everyone he's met, the monster finally encounters someone that treats him like a gentle human only because he can't see. This is echoed wonderfully earlier by the monster even slapping at his own reflection in the water. But I was stunned to find even myself shedding a tear when the old blind man sets by the monster's side on the bed and the monster himself cries as he mutters the word "friend".

More than just horror classics, Frankenstein and Bride of Frankenstein seem more like mythological classics. They seem to be works that have existed forever in one form or another. They are timeless films that are profound in their depiction of humanity and their relationship with life, death, and so-called monsters. But because of Whale they're also given a light, humor and camp, but also a visual and dramatic ingenuity and potency. These are films that can be read so many ways because they are so incredibly rich. And like the characters in Gods and Monsters, whether you're frightened, humored, or saddened I'd propose that they're all equally "right" reactions. They reveal the timeless richness these films possess.
I really should've taken some time and wrote more about Frankenstein and Bride but I feel really tired and worn-out today. I guess not doing a plot synopsis shortened them significantly but I don't know if I really captured how much I love both of those films.
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Postby Guyver Spawn » Fri Feb 26, 2010 9:52 pm

Cop Out - Not the best Kevin Smith movie, and could have been better. I wish Jay and Bob would return though. This movie was pretty much a comdey version of Diehard mixed with Rush Hour. 7/10
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Postby Bomby von Bombsville » Fri Feb 26, 2010 10:49 pm

Eva Yojimbo wrote::hitthetable: That was an awesome write-up, Bomby! I've never heard of Kwak or his films but if they're half as amusing as your review I may see one in spite of everything!

I definitely recommend going through the Kwak experience at least once. Or perhaps only once. My Sassy Girl is easily his most likable film and the one most worth watching. It has a few embarrassingly bad sequences but is overall a cute diversion, if not a bit overlong. I'll openly admit that I actually quite like the film, but the jury's still out on whether or not I should consider it a guilty pleasure. Jeon Ji-Hyun is great as "the girl," no matter how you cut it.

But if you want the true Kwak experience, there's Windstruck the messiest, most uneven, most cruelly overly melodramatic film ever made. The end doesn't really make sense if you haven't seen My Sassy Girl, though.

Cyborg Girl gets points for having an Eva reference and the ever-so-lovable Haruka Ayase.
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Postby Evangelion217 » Sat Feb 27, 2010 1:53 am

6.0/10[/b][spoiler]The most disappointing film of the year I've seen thus far. The Hurt Locker is a film about a EOD or Explosive Ordinance Disposal unit in Iraq. When their first tech dies, a wild, hotshot Staff Sergeant named William James joins the upright Sergeant Sanborn and their neurotic specialist Owen Eldridge. The film opens with a quote about how war can be a potent drug because of the rush of life and death situations and it becomes obvious very early on that James has made it his drug of choice as he recklessly rushes into situations to disarm various explosive devices powerful enough to kill him and his team in an instance.

The film has "powerful, intense drama" written right into its premise but the problem is that situations are so predictable and monotonous


There was nothing predictable or dull about any of the power, intense dramatic scenes within the film. Unlike most directors of war films, Kathryn actually envelopes the audience into the action, and puts you within the situation. I've seen so many other war films that had the same amount of direction towards tension, but nothing quit like this.

the characters so flat and cliches,


The cliches make them iconic, and the performances make them human.

For drama so intense you could bite your nails down to nubs, the Hurt Locker has nothing on Black Hawk Down


It's actually a lot better, and less tediouse with it's depiction of violence. "Black Hawk Down" is a damn good film, but it gives you nothing to care about, and it feels like a video game at times.

[quote]For intriguing characters and performances in a film dealing with the internal struggle of a unit at war the film has nothing on Platoon or even the relatively minor Tigerland. Hell, for a war film about explosives I'll even take the relatively obscure No Man's Land that won the Oscar for Best Foreign Film a few years ago[/quote[

I haven't seen them yet, so I can't comment.

Perhaps one could argue this makes it more honest to the way it is in war, yet it makes for lazy writing and film-making when you can just set up situations that arise easily from the premise with a kind of tenseness built into them


It's not lazy, since it has build up, and a sense of chaos to the way it's depicted. It's authentic, and well.........nail biting.

Yet we never care enough about the characters to really fear for their lives


Yes we do.

and we pretty much know that James is going to have to survive (at least, until some kind of potential climax)


No we don't, but that ending was haunting.

which somewhat lessens the threat of the scenes of his disarming the bombs


No it doesn't, since we don't know that he's going to survive.

The waiting that ensues is reminiscent of another superior war film called Enemy at the Gates


"Enemy At The Gates" had some of the worst acting, dialogue, and music ques that I've seen in any war film. I've seen worse films within the war genre, but "Enemy At The Gate" probably stands as the most disappointing of them all. All that talent, and nobody was able to create a memorable performance. Everything felt one-note and hollywoodized. With an unnecessary and unintentionally funny sex scene that was actually more entertaining then the film itself.

Technically, Bigelow very much subscribes to the theory that shaky cam, zooms, and fast cutting makes everything more intense and dramatic


It did, and it created the most engrossing tone and atmosphere that I've seen in a war film since "Letters From Iwo Jima." And that's saying a lot!

and while I don't know about everyone else I think I'm quite worn out with the style


I've been worn out by that style for over 4 years. But "The Hurt Locker" did it right.

Overall, it's a decent film but nothing more. With so many genuinely great films that's been released this year and so many of the great Best Picture nominees I'll be quite pissed if this barely above-average film wins


I think it deserves the win for Best Picture. It's an important, intense, and thought provocking war film that creates images that will stay with us for YEARS! But I'd be happy if "Avatar", "Ingloriouse Basters", "UP", or "A Seriouse Man" wins as well. But if any of those films beat "The Hurt Locker" for Best Picture, then it will be an upset. No question about that.
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Postby Evangelion217 » Sat Feb 27, 2010 1:56 am

Rashomon has always been my second or third favourite Kurosawa film. Meh, whatever. It's not like that matters


The acting in "Rashomon" is pretty dreadful at times. It's a good film, but I guess the acting is too over the top for me. You haven't seen ham, until you've seen the performances in "Rashomon!" LOL!

After my second viewing, I give it a 7/10. My original rating was a 9/10, but I must of ignored some of the bad acting throughout the experience. It's easily Kurosawa's weakest effort.
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Postby Reichu » Sat Feb 27, 2010 2:10 am

Does this thread need to be renamed "General Movie Review Thread"?
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Postby Oz » Sat Feb 27, 2010 2:23 am

Evangelion217 wrote:It's easily Kurosawa's weakest effort.

:crazytwirl:

So you were not intrigued (to the level of praising it as a masterpiece, that is) by:
A) the complex narrative (it was innovative back then - nowadays Rashomon has been endlessly copied and imitated)
B) the ambiguous plot
C) philosophical and psychological observations on memory and what is exactly "evil"
D) Toshiro Mifune's BRILLIANT performance

Kurosawa is known for his melodrama, of course, but he handles the melodrama far better than anyone else in the world.

PS: Replying to others later in this thread. I have to write two film reviews first and do something else as well.
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Postby Uriel Septim VII » Sat Feb 27, 2010 2:31 am

Reichu wrote:Does this thread need to be renamed "General Movie Review Thread"?


Only after a long debate on the semantics of the word "satisfying" in this case. Did the movie as an independent subject give the satisfaction directly, or is it, in the case of some of these films, the relief of venting about how awful or mundane the movie is that gives satisfaction?

Also, I saw Children of Heaven, and that movie undoubtedly need be mentioned here.

Oz wrote:Kurosawa is known for his melodrama, of course, but he handles the melodrama far better than anyone else in the world.


I understand Rashomon was one of his earliest works, so he was still getting into his niche back then, but Stray Dog came out a year earlier and had just as many moral themes, without the same level of melodrama or sentimentality. The movie actually reminded me of a modern cop film like Se7en in its wit. It might not be best to use the word "melodrama", as there are a few rare instances where that word isn't used as a pejorative. I'm certain that while we appreciate subtlety in the West, places like India and Japan seem to have different criteria for what is good and great acting. Mifune yells a lot, and doesn't afraid to describe all his thoughts and emotions in detail, and he's one of the best actors ever... Then there's Takeshi Kitano, who's so subtle that he's scary.
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Postby Merridian » Sat Feb 27, 2010 9:21 am

Evangelion217 wrote:The acting in "Rashomon" is pretty dreadful at times. It's a good film, but I guess the acting is too over the top for me. You haven't seen ham, until you've seen the performances in "Rashomon!" LOL!
:lol: lolwtf Someone hasn't seen The Virgin Spring, apparently. Kurosawa's got nuthin on Bergman's melodrama.

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Postby Xard » Sat Feb 27, 2010 9:44 am

Evangelion217 wrote:The acting in "Rashomon" is pretty dreadful at times. It's a good film, but I guess the acting is too over the top for me. You haven't seen ham, until you've seen the performances in "Rashomon!" LOL!


(:|

yeah, right

It's not like every single Kurosawa is in the same style, not at all*


*Ikiru might be a bit more restrained but not much
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Postby ran1 » Sat Feb 27, 2010 9:56 am

Merridian wrote: lolwtf Someone hasn't seen The Virgin Spring, apparently. Kurosawa's got nuthin on Bergman's melodrama.


Aww, lets leave Bergman out of it. That's a film he said he himself hated just for the fact that there was too much melodrama. Kurosawa :heart: melodrama. But I don't think that considering the nature of it, there is too much melodrama. He walks a fine line in this film, and it might be enjoyable for some and annoying for others precisely because of it.
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Postby FreakyFilmFan4ever » Sat Feb 27, 2010 10:03 am

Gendo'sPapa wrote:BOUND might be my personal favorite Wachowski Siblings film.

I've heard rumors that the film was made because they Wachowski's were going around trying to get financing for their script to the original Matrix.

Yeah, I remember that about the movie. That's probably what led to believe it was a short (though, I don't know why). I admire Joel Silver and the Wachowski, um... Siblings (?) for doing that.

SPOILER: Show
I've heard Larry Wachowski became Lana via sex-change. Is that true?
Last edited by FreakyFilmFan4ever on Sat Feb 27, 2010 10:17 am, edited 1 time in total.
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ran1
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Postby ran1 » Sat Feb 27, 2010 10:10 am

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I've heard Larry Wachowski became Lana via sex-change. Is that true?

San Fransisco Chronicle says yes.
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Postby FreakyFilmFan4ever » Sat Feb 27, 2010 10:21 am

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ran1 wrote:
I've heard Larry Wachowski became Lana via sex-change. Is that true?

San Fransisco Chronicle says yes.

See, I heard that reported before Speed Racer was released. But also heard that debunked.

Hm. imdb.com list Andy and Lana Wachowski as the directors. But if memory serves me, the credits in the film listed them as Andy and Larry.
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Postby Gendo'sPapa » Sat Feb 27, 2010 1:27 pm

http://cdn.fd.uproxx.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/12/LanaWachowski-AriannaHuff1.jpg


The one with the pink hair is Larry/Lana.

Oz
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Postby Oz » Sat Feb 27, 2010 3:27 pm

@Uriel: Which I put it to you may be taken to mean Stray Dog wasn't melodramatic or sentimental

Mindfuck.

@Jimbo:
Eva Yojimbo wrote:I wouldn't say he succeeds in the visual arena either. Neither of the Bong films I've seen are as striking as anything in Park's Vengeance Trilogy.

I don't know if you meant it the way I understood it at first, but to me it seems you imply that Bong's form should be as colorful/spectacular Park's. That would be a weird thing to say so I guess it's just me reading too much into your reply. In any case, it's a harsh comparison when you compare anyone to Park in terms of form because his form is so refined and varying. Even though there are tonal similarities between Park's and Bong's films, Bong portrays in a vastly different fashion that is a bit harder to get used to.

Eva Yojimbo wrote:But I felt the documentary style brought a palpable realism to that film.

In my opinion, there is a clear difference between realism and what is nauseating and incomprehensible.

Eva Yojimbo wrote:You can't speak of sentimentality when it's an accurate representation of actual events.

... huh?

---

I decided to rewatch two films by Robert Bresson yesterday (and I plan to watch A Man Escaped soon): Balthazar & Mouchette.

And I also watched Tarkovsky's and Guerra's documentary, Voyage in Time, and wrote briefly about it.
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Postby Bomby von Bombsville » Sat Feb 27, 2010 4:16 pm

Menace II Society (Allen & Albert Hughes)
So I try to reclaim my manhood after watching The Classic, only to end up damn near crying at the end of this film. Yes, it's a very didactic film, but with the exception of a few scenes, it avoids the overly dramatic trappings of most "message" movies (especially compared to Boyz N The Hood, which is still a pretty good film anyway). Aside from having one of the worst sex scenes ever filmed, it's overall a pretty solid film and an impressive debut.

Unfortunately, the Hughes brothers would never make another watchable film again.

I feel a bit of guilt watching this film; I used to do music with someone who was on a path to an unsure future, much like the character Caine in this film. His dad was on death row, his mom always had different boyfriends, and I could sense a lot of anger in him about his situation, and a desperation to make things in his life better. He moved to Florida (not the tourist or retirement part) about a year and a half ago, and I haven't really checked up on him since. I guess for one thing, he's always changing phone numbers so I really don't have a way to check up on him, but sometimes when I think about him I get worried that he might have gotten into some bullshhit.
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Postby Twin Drive Sigma Aquarion » Sat Feb 27, 2010 8:00 pm

Planet Hulk

Unlike the majority of Marvel animated films this was a step up in the animation department, the movie itself is very fluid and nice to watch with a ton of actiony scenes. :bigguns: Being a Hulk fanatic and loving the story from the comics this was a no brainer to watch and save for a few minor details the story was done in VERY good faith to the comics with actual pictures shown in the credits! For what few changes they did make they did well although I have to ask why Silver Surfer got replaced by Beta Ray Bill; I guess because Surfer has already had enough appearances and BRB has virtually none while still fitting the requirement for mystical powered alien. Bottom line, awesome movie is awesome, it's officially one of my all time favorites and it barely passes Hulk VS. :cool:

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Postby Joseph the PRPD » Sat Feb 27, 2010 8:28 pm

^- I enjoyed Planet Hulk as well.

For awhile now I've been hoping that MARVEL animation steps up and makes an animation adaption of one particular comic...
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Marvel Zombies

I will be so happy if they ever animate that. Especially if the Army of Darkness crossover is included.
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