TMB's super happy fun Eva model-building adventures

Fanfiction, fan art, AMVs, and any other fan creations or Eva-related projects: share your work and discuss others' here.

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Postby TMBounty_Hunter » Tue Jul 14, 2015 7:45 am

Is it the ball/peg or the cup part that broke?

EDIT: Which part number?

EDIT 2: There's actually two ball joints that hold the shoulder pylon on, so I really do need more specifics to try and help you.

In general though:
Part numbers Right(Left)

The first one is G18(18) ball sitting inside E17(18) cup.
The second is A2(1) ball sitting inside C9(10) cup.

If it is the ball peg that broke I would first recommend cementing G18 into A1(2) and letting it cure for a few days to make sure it's nice and solid. Where those two parts meet they will now make a much beefier piece of plastic into which to drill to put a pin to make the new ball peg.

If it's the cups that broke then it's far more annoying. I don't know the specifics of the injury but in most cases I would just recommend finding a healthy part and recasting it. The parts under tension don't really like being cemented/glued.
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Postby TMBounty_Hunter » Thu Jul 23, 2015 3:55 pm

Image


Don't they just all look awesome sitting there? Everyone would want to look that awesome. So I tried a thingi with some foam, since foam is light, easy to cut/carve/sand and people in general like to use it for dioramas because of those properties.

Trying to figure out a decent layout



Image



An 11" by 11" square seemed a reasonable size. Just plain insulation foam for most of the bulk of the base. The panels are layered 1/4 inch foam. Now Tamiya does actually make various thickness of rigid polystyrene foam for hobby purposes, from 1mm up to 10mm thick, but that stuff is nowhere to be found locally and I'll be damned if I pay for shipping of foam.

But, foamcore presentation board is a plenty everywhere and if you manage to get the paper off the sides you have youre 1/4 inch foam to use for whatever your heart desires. Elmer's stuff is all over the craft stores but it's overpriced and the glue is strong. You have to soak it in water to dissolve the glue and paper and get it off bit by bit. Dollar store stuff is much better, the paper just peels off cleanly.

Getting a tapered edge = two metal rulers of different width

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Assembling individual panels

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Slapping on the panels

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And after all the glue dries and all the bits are trimmed off to fit back in the slightly under 11" by 11" square it looks passable. Temporary guardrail out of paper just to size things up.



Image

Image

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Maybe, just maybe this would have been saner to build at 1/72 scale...
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Postby Orgeston » Tue Sep 15, 2015 9:35 pm

Hi there, I've read through the thread and I'm really impressed with your work! I was wondering if you could impart your knowledge on duplicating parts like you did with the tank treads and the gun barrel, or refer me to a good tutorial. Thanks.
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Postby TMBounty_Hunter » Wed Sep 16, 2015 8:50 pm

Everything I've learned about mold-making and resin casting I've learned from the internets. In the recent decade or so there has been a massive influx of knowledge sharing and new materials due to the feedback loop of makers/crafters/cosplayers getting more popular and feeding knowledge and material demand.

Material companies these days have their own internet presence with lots of video tutorials on how to use their product and etc.

Smooth-On is a company that tends to be the most popular due to their materials being very easy to use, usually 1-1 mix ratio for both silicones and resins. Their youtube channel covers tons and tons of stuff: https://www.youtube.com/user/SmoothOnInc
Polytek is another popular one.
They have their own youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/PolytekDevelopment
But also there's a store that carriers their products and has many, many more useful and awesome videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/brickintheyard
Tested.com has also been doing lots of great molding and casting videos with Frank Ippolito: https://www.youtube.com/user/testedcom/

If you're gonna do model/figure building I would highly recommend the Gundam Scratch Build Manual books. They're entirely in Japanese but have a billion of pictures that are still extraordinarily useful. Both the first and 2nd book have sections on mold-making and casting with lots of intricacies addressed. IMO those two books are worth their weight in gold.

There's loads and loads of ways to mold and cast parts.
The tank treads were a simple two-part mold. Lots of tutorials for those around.
The tank barrel was an extremely quick and lazy "dump mold" that was later cut apart. I seem to have not bothered posting the relevant pics but basically the original tank barrel had a parallel feeder channel attached, that was then put into a crudely made container and filled with just enough silicon: http://i.imgur.com/hc7VQ0c.jpg
Because silicon on itself is floopy, I made a quick support shell out of Ultracal (it's cheap as hell and I had a 50lb bag from a helmet project): http://i.imgur.com/N8Ybaye.jpg
Pour whatever resin I had laying around into it (some clear stuff) and voila: http://i.imgur.com/Gph4Xim.jpg
At the top of this picture is the feeder channel, at the bottom is the barrel casting, all the fancy stuff inbetween is the "flash", resin seeping where the mold was cut apart.
Keep in mind this was far from a good example of mold making, it was just the quickest way I needed to get things done. You can mold the same thing in lots of ways depeding on time/effort/materials/preference/laziness.
I do have another Eva thingi where I did a brush-on glove mold but that's not quite done enough to make a post about it and I'd rather post it all at once for maximum damage.

EDIT: Oh, and there will be quite a few attempts at somewhat fancy 2-part molds whenever I finish up refining the Bandai Wille Eva armor.

Speaking of ways of using resin. I really needed some 1/35 scale Japanese guardrails for my tank diorama. Fujimi makes Japanese guardrails in 1/24 scale because cars come in that, some western companies make 1/35 scale western guardrails but those are way too soft and wavy in their profile. For reference, Japanese guardrails:
Image

If you ever need reference image of something in from a particular region, go to english wikipedia article for that thing (ie guardrails), go look for the relevant other language (ie Japanese) and copy pasta that into google image search and voila, it's as if you were a local of that area googling shit up.

Doing all that googling I stumbled upon a way to actually make the guardrails. This blog, which at the time of posting seems to be inaccessible for some reason has a build of the Lupin III Castle of Cagliostro Fiat diorama, and uses some plastic mold to shape a metal sheet as necessary: http://dorobou.blog.so-net.ne.jp/2010-10-24

Here are the relevant picture rehosted for your pleasure:
http://i.imgur.com/7XGNPNb.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/J3NHsDC.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/AR6fso6.jpg
Thanks for the knowledge internet!

Well the good news is that there's styrene shapes available that can be cobbled together to make the mold for the guardrail I need:
Image

But styrene is kinda soft. However, if I make a silicone mold of the styrene master, I can use that at the master itself as a mold to cast some much, much harder urethane resin positive and negative parts.
Image

And then those can be shoved into a vice to squish together thin metal sheets (for the test it was the totally FREE aluminium can) to make a to-scale looking guardrail:
Image

Sure it's crude looking now but at least it proved the method will work once tweaked.


Also woop woop 2 year thread anniversary and only 2 things finished during that time. :raincloud:
Last edited by TMBounty_Hunter on Sun Feb 05, 2017 10:37 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Orgeston » Sat Sep 19, 2015 8:16 pm

Alright, thanks for the info!
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Postby Shamsiel-kun » Fri Sep 25, 2015 4:13 am

Couldn't you have used these:

[url]http://www.squadron.com/1-35-Meng-Barricades-Highway-Guardrail-p/mmsps013.htm[/url]

Also, your "Japanese" guardrails look suspiciously like older West European ones (which are being replaced in places because they can't stand impacts from heavy trucks and tend to decapitate or otherwise badly injure fallen motorcyclists):

[url]http://www.profishop.nl/Stalen-vangrail-lengte-4300-mm-22102-118399/[/url]

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Postby Orgeston » Mon Jan 25, 2016 5:52 pm

Another question, have you ever painted the elastic arms on the TV models? I put together a Unit-02, and now that I'm painting it I'm finding that the paint (I'm using Testor enamel) leeches the solvents from the synthetic rubber so it takes forever to cure, and then it cracks and peels off incredibly easily. How would you recommend going about this? Also, what technique did you use to remove the flashing from that area?
Thanks.
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Postby TMBounty_Hunter » Mon Jan 25, 2016 9:33 pm

I never bothered painting the rubber because it's too much trouble. It already comes molded in the correct color so there's no real issue leaving it alone. None of the hobby paint are designed for painting flexible material and they'll all form a rigid layer that'll crack and flake with the slightest of movement. You only risk having the paint solvents damaging the rubber and if that falls apart you'll have to strip it off and resculpt the arms out of solid material in a fixed pose but at least that will be easily paintable.

As for the seam line you could theoretically sand it off with a fine grit sandpaper but that will still leave a variance in surface finish unless you sand all the rubber at which point you're once again entering the territory of too much effort with no much gain.
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Postby Orgeston » Tue Jan 26, 2016 4:27 am

Alright, thanks, good to know.

Any chance of new stuff from you?
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Postby TMBounty_Hunter » Tue Jan 26, 2016 6:52 am

Soon™
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Postby Shamsiel-kun » Fri Jan 29, 2016 5:34 pm

View Original PostTMBounty_Hunter wrote:I never bothered painting the rubber because it's too much trouble. It already comes molded in the correct color so there's no real issue leaving it alone. None of the hobby paint are designed for painting flexible material and they'll all form a rigid layer that'll crack and flake with the slightest of movement. You only risk having the paint solvents damaging the rubber and if that falls apart you'll have to strip it off and resculpt the arms out of solid material in a fixed pose but at least that will be easily paintable.

As for the seam line you could theoretically sand it off with a fine grit sandpaper but that will still leave a variance in surface finish unless you sand all the rubber at which point you're once again entering the territory of too much effort with no much gain.


There is paint that is suitable for flexible surfaces. Firstly, you need to use acrylic or alcohol-based paints. Anything else will likely react with the rubber, turning everything into a sticky mess, or refuse to fully dry, or fall off. Tamiya paints, if mixed properly, actually can withstand some flexing, but you can also try paints for polycarbonate R/C car bodies, which are designed to be flexible. Consider first using an acrylic primer (Tamiya primer in a can works, and so does Mr. Surfacer) and preparing as usual. Furthermore, at auto-parts stores you can find colored markers specifically designed to be used on rubber (for marking tires). They are usually available in red, yellow, green, blue, and white.
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Postby TMBounty_Hunter » Mon Feb 06, 2017 1:10 am

Awwwwwwww shiiiiiiiiiiit what's this? Thread back to life after a whole year of abandonment? WOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOP!

First some housekeeping. The first two pages of this thread were full of dead images because the host I used back then went under. Those images have now been rehosted and restored.

As for physical housekeeping, last summer I ended up rebuilding my spraybooth to be bigger and better so now I have a much lovelier environment to work in. I've also experimented a bit more with molding and casting, that experience should come in handy with a few future projects.

Finally, that photo of my Eva kit stockpile in the first post has gotten very outdated. I'd make a new one but all the various kits are tucked away in different places for now.
So take that pile and add:
-Bandai Wille Eva kits
-New Kotobukiya plastic kits
-Bunch of military vehicles and ships that appeared in the franchise but not actually Eva kits.
Highlight of new acquisitions has been a kit I've been hunting for forever: Fujimi release of Misato's A310 and I found one at a great price: http://i.imgur.com/Uc8Lsgz.jpg


Ok onward to some actual content. We pick up where we left off with the foam base. All the holes were patched up, it was clean up and then finally sealed with some gesso. If you don't seal the foam, most spray paints will melt it and I really like spray paint.

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Afterwards the gesso was sanded down as much as it was reasonable and then spray painted with about 53 and a half coats of Krylon primer. There was a lot more sanding and spraying trying to get a nice finish. Primer on:

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In the end I could not keep the bottom of this base from getting knocked around so I had to hide it in some way. Most model kit builders out there will prepare up some fancy wooden base for it with a nicely routed profile along the edge. I couldn't just do that because I needed to recess the base to hide the messed up bottom. First idea was to go get some trim and make a frame around the base. That'll give an image of the typical wooden base but with the edges raised. Small problem however: the foam base was not actually perfectly square. All that trimming of the high foam sides made it that way. I tried my best to cut the miters juuuuuuust right for all 4 corner to line up

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But in the end I could not. If you want a nicely stained wooden base you can't really have massive gaps or use fillers, you have to get it perfect. I gave up. Instead I went to the material that's far friendlier: styrene. I have loads of it styrene sheets because I build bigger props too. It's a wonder to work with. Cements really easily, sands and carves well. Here's the final product before paint:

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One easy way to make sure you're the same height all the way around is to superglue razor blades to the corner of an aluminium brick and you'll always cut at the height of the brick. Very convenient.

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Since I could build the styrene around the existing base it was very easy to make the fit perfect:

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Very happy with this.

You may have notice the tiny frame on one of the sides, that's for a title plaque for the whole piece. Remember the old annotated DVD release of 1.01 that had a detailed kanji-soup label for everything? That's what goes in there. The easier way to get a nice label made these days is with a laser cutter. A local hacker space had one so I asked them to help me out.

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Interesting thing I found out in the process is that to prevent fouling up the piece in the process they protect it with masking tape. Different laser power levels shown:

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If it cuts masking tape, surely I can use it as a mask and just paint in the letters, right?

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Not really. Since I couldn't do vector engraving with the text I needed it could only do a raster one and it's not quite clean enough for a perfect mask. Instead the solution was to laser engrave it in mirror, so that it's on the back side of the plastic and put it up against a black background

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This'll definitely do. Fits nicely in the frame too, just needs background paint:

Image


That's it for today! Probably an underwhelming post after all this time huh? On the bright side more proper content posts will be coming at an actually reasonable pace. This tank project has been gnawing at me for too long and I'm pushing to get it done. Preliminary schedule of future posts:
-Guardrails construction finalized
-Tracks getting finished
-Tank barrel getting tweaked one last time
-Everything fully painted and finished

With the Type 76 out of the way we'll get back to what started this thread:
-Volks TV Eva-02
-Bandai TV Eva-02

After that I'll probably tackle the gigantic vinyl Eva-01 shown earlier in this thread and finally a super duper secret project that's been progressing super secretly for 2.5 years in complete darkness.
There's a local scale model competition on May 6th so that's a big new motivation for me. Need to finish a bunch of silly giant models.

After that probably the Wille Evas? Who knows, we'll see.
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Postby Squigsquasher » Mon Feb 06, 2017 4:18 am

Woohoo! The prodigal son returns!

I wish I was that good at scratchbuilding. I'm OK-ish at sculpting organic bits and pieces but I'm hopeless at the precise cutting needed for scratchbuilding with Styrene. Doesn't help that for some reason, even with a really sharp scalpel blade I struggle to cut through the stuff in the first place.
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Postby TMBounty_Hunter » Mon Feb 06, 2017 8:38 am

Cutting isn't what's precise with styrene, it's the ability to fill and sand.

What i should have mentioned also is that on top of that aluminium brick being used to trim, it was also used later in conjunction with another aluminium brick with sandpaper glued onto it. Have an overhand of extra styrene, then trim it down to perfect. In general that's what i found works for me regardless of material: apply way too much of it first and then carve/file/sand down to exactness. Trying to do it with exactness first I'm not too successful at.
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Postby Bagheera » Tue Feb 07, 2017 10:16 pm

This little project's coming along nicely. It's always neat to see the process people go through to do these things; makes it less intimidating for the rest of us!

Also, what's that kanji soup say, anyway?
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Postby Reichu » Tue Feb 07, 2017 11:13 pm

@ Kanji soup, see items 3 and 2 (in that order) here.
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Postby kevinlowl » Wed Mar 22, 2017 1:13 am

Look forward to the Eva builds, not too interested with these prop items (unless it's that Iowa-class).

Hurry up mayn :D

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Postby TMBounty_Hunter » Wed Mar 22, 2017 10:07 pm

Well I had a plane earlier but it all went a bit sideways yet again. Whoops.

Some time last year, I forget exactly when, I did the tracks for the tank and they turned out great. However when I weathered them I went waaaay overboard and they kinda gummed up and stuck together. I just put them aside because fuck it. About a month ago I went back to them and decided to strip the paint off completely and hopefully salvage them. The only issue is that stripping paint off of styrene can be iffy, but I knew I could do it with Mr. Color thinner. For a long time I though that was a lacquer thinner and would just completely dissolve the styrene but turns out it's not. The lacquer component is in the paint itself and in the Mr. Restoring Agent or whatever it's called. Anyway tracks went into the thinner, paint came off about 98% and the styrene was perfectly fine. However, of all things that I didn't expect to happen was that the thinner attacked the urethane parts that I cast myself and made them really soft. I was mildly freaked out by this revelation because in my previous experience with urethane that shit is very resistant to chemicals and often advertised as so. I guess the issue this time was that it was really thin parts. Anyway I put it all aside yet again to see what happens. Eventually the urethane seems to have re-hardened and now the tracks seem to be fine for the most part. Have to redo prep and paint but probably still very useable? I donno really. Might redo them again, haven't decided yet.

Moving on with other parts of the same project there was the issue of how to assemble the now fully formed guard rails. After a bit of thinking it seemed to me that the easiest and most secure way is to assemble them with holes and bolt/rivets just like the real thing and also reinforced with glue. Thank goodness you can buy disgustingly tiny rivets on ebay. These are 0.5mm shaft and 0.8mm head. I got some hexagonal shape styrene rod to make pretend nuts but now I'm waiting on set of photo etch washers to arrive to complete the set. Should arrive next monday and look just about perfect when assembled.

Rivet test

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While we wait for rivets and are too lazy to work on other almost finished project we can always check mandarake for some cheap ass resin kits. Found this one and ordered it because why the hell not?

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Original price 8,800 yen but selling at only 1,000 yen? Seriously why the hell not?

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I guess they each get their own bag for privacy reasons?


Molding quality is good enough for a 1,000 yen buy. A bit of mold shift but nothing that's hard to fix. I have a different Kotobukiya Shinji kit that has mold shit on the hand and all the fingers are completely ruined and need to be redone...

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Starting out by re-scribing the detail that needs re-scribing because that will make the painting easier. Tried it out on the 2 first because I didn't even know how well it would work on this kit. Some resin isn't as easy to scribe as others and you never know until you try.

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After being happy with the 2 the 0 is also rescribed

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With Asuka's chest number done Shinji's also needs fixing

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Was quite happy with this as well

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The bigger 2 on the back was actually more annoying to re-scribe

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Nowhere near as clean result but nothing that some priming and sanding can't fix.

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Anyway here's a test of Asuka pinned together. Actually did that only a few hours ago so this is the freshest update there ever was in this thread. Please don't mind the limbless Shinji, he'll get pinned together tomorrow.

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