Netflix's Death Note Live Action Adaptation

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Cybermat47
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Re: Netflix's Death Note Live Action Adaptation

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Postby Cybermat47 » Mon Jul 10, 2017 10:29 pm

View Original PostRay wrote:I'll say here about the female characters in Death Note what Bob Gale and Robert zemeckis said about Marty McFly a white guy stealing Chuck Berry's ( a black guys) biggest hit.

" as Freud said, sometimes a cigar is just a cigar".


Perhaps, but when a character exists only to look sexy and act as a plot point, it's stupid, regardless of their gender.
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Re: Netflix's Death Note Live Action Adaptation

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Postby FreakyFilmFan4ever » Tue Jul 11, 2017 5:58 am

View Original PostGendo'sPapa wrote:Now the little sister who has been a nonexistent side character returns as a sexy young adult... and is immediately kidnapped & used as bait for dumb plot shenanigans.

This must be what fans say when they talk of the show's "character 'development.'"

Though, to be fair, I'm not sure how old the fan base for this show was in the US. It might just be a fandom that survives solely on endless supply of adolescent kids getting all horny over pretty girls, using that motivation to save the day, then slowly losing interest in the show as they get older and the hormones calm down a little. This doesn't condone anything, obviously, but it's usually a passing phase that people tend to get embarrassed about as they get older.

Wash, rinse, repeat for the next generation, due to the tendency of younger US audiences to constantly rediscover anime titles and perpetuate a fan base. (Rediscovery by younger generations is, in part, why Cowboy Bebop continues to popularity in the States better than it does in Japan.)
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Re: Netflix's Death Note Live Action Adaptation

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Postby robersora » Tue Jul 11, 2017 10:48 am

I watched Death Note when I was 15 and the premise alone made me think that this is the coolest thing ever.
And that's about it.
Looking back to it I can recognize how dumb it is, but when you're a teenager an edgy premise suffices to make it enjoyable. And most people who watch Anime are at that age-range. See Sword Art Online for a more recent example.

As for the Netflix version; I still think the premise is cooler than a frozen hell, and without the Shonen-shenanigans/a proper script this might work out to be pretty dope. I've also watched the new Japanese Live Action movie that came out last year and the premise coupled with exactly my kind of slick aesthetic made me enjoy it. Sure, I've already forgotten most of it, but it was enjoyable enough.

What I'm trying to say is, most people don't have the time or the education or both to even bother with the intellectual content of anything. If the premise is cool, and the execution flashy enough people will thankfully take the break from their lives. That is why Death Note has become a phenomenon. It felt fresh, emo, cool, edgy, suspenseful and quirky.
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Re: Netflix's Death Note Live Action Adaptation

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Postby Tankred » Tue Jul 11, 2017 2:42 pm

View Original PostCybermat47 wrote:Perhaps, but when a character exists only to look sexy and act as a plot point, it's stupid, regardless of their gender.


Death Note had a large cohort of fujoshi so I don't know why anyone cares that it's the other way around now, Death Note was burning edge nonsense when it came out, now it's just a dated 2000's anime that really is nothing outside of its own era. To put it a little bluntly: It's not on many 2000's anime watch lists created by reputable individuals, unless you're curious about that era and wonder why it was so popular (though the premise should suffice for most people).

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Re: Netflix's Death Note Live Action Adaptation

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Postby Gendo'sPapa » Wed Jul 19, 2017 7:43 pm

Show was a disappointment. Was planning on writing a lengthy essay on why it's not good but I'm two days post finishing it.... and I can barely remember the damn thing anymore. The characters, the plot, everything has just vanished from my mind. I think that speaks more about the show than anything else I could say.

Either way, still interested in Adam Wingard's adaptation because I do think there's the skeleton for a great story there & I think he could bring it out. On the plus side it's screening at the San Diego Comic Con tomorrow night (July 20th) a whole month before it gets released on Netflix. That's a very positive sign of confidence for the finished film.

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Re: Netflix's Death Note Live Action Adaptation

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Postby Ray » Wed Jul 19, 2017 8:45 pm

By all means, I'd love to see a full rant on why you didn't like what many people have claimed to be a great anime.

Look, I'm not gonna say it's perfect, but it didn't have to be a perfect, it just had to be a great detective show with some supernatural elements.

Ultimately the only thing still up in the air is the casting controversy, and even that seems to have died down considerably after the GITS and Iron Fist Controversies.

Speaking of which, really Netflix was probably the best choice the director could have made. Iron Fist broke records despite it's controversy while GITS failed because of the mere difference between streaming services and movie theatres. A movie on a streaming service is free with a subscription, so if you hear about a controversial film and are curious about it, you can watch it without having to spend anymore money on it. While with a theatrical release, Box Office Numbers ultimately determine the bottom line, and that's something negative press can for better or worse affect.
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Re: Netflix's Death Note Live Action Adaptation

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Postby CommanderFish » Thu Jul 20, 2017 9:16 pm

Just reading through this thread now and I'm honestly surprised to see how much hate the original anime series is getting. I watched through all of it for the first time fairly recently and I thought that it was pretty good, albeit not perfect and (as many have already said) quite lacking in the latter third.

Let me make this clear though: just like pwhodges and Gendo'sPapa, I was initially taken aback by the utter lack of discussion the show had surrounding the moral implications of the Death Note, and specifically what Light was doing with it. There were about 5 seconds of inner-monologue in the first episode and that was it. And at that moment, I really did ask myself, "what could possibly be the appeal of this show?"

But then I watch episode 2 and I immediately get it.

The appeal, at least for me, never had to do with rooting for Light. The appeal for me, and what I think was the intended appeal for the viewer, was in watching two very smart people play a life-and-death chess match with each other (for lack of a better term); it was in the ever-shifting dynamic between two geniuses who were so alike yet so different from each other, actively trying to one-up their opponent every chance they get. The show is Light and L, and I don't think it makes any attempt at hiding that. In my mind, the viewer is meant to inhabit the same space as Ryuk; we are just along for the ride, not on anybody's side if we don't want to be, just there to watch and appreciate all the twist and turns. And that's exactly why...

SPOILER: Show
...the show sucks so much after L dies. Because that interesting dynamic is lost, and replaced with bland, tasteless replicas who serve only to push the plot forward, (over all of its holes, of which stack up beyond a level of acceptance come the story's end).

Don't get me wrong, I understand that this type of story may not appeal to everybody. It does get pretty stupid at times, especially involving some of the stuff with Misa and the Yotsuba Group. And some people are just not willing to put up that stupidity; or maybe just can't be solely engaged by a battle-of-the-minds type plot in the first place. I understand all of that, and the purpose of this post was to help others at least understand why the show might be possibly appealing regardless.

But what I don't understand are the complaints about Light.

The show never tells you to root for him. On the contrary: it shows you how sadistic, evil, manipulative, and uncaring of a guy he is throughout the entire show. And when he thrusts out his whole "new-world" thesis at the end of the show, he is not in any way validated for it. He gets called out as what he is--nothing but a murderer with a God complex--and then proceeds to writhe in a pool of his own blood, pitifully calling for help, while everyone else in the room looks down on him in utter disgust. When L dies, sad music plays. When Light dies, happy music plays. The show could not make it any more obvious in my mind, and it simply baffles me how anyone could interpret it as supporting Light's beliefs in any way.

What Death Note does is it presents us with a very smart young man who comes into contact with absolute power and is corrupted absolutely by it. We are not meant to sympathize with Kira, (or Light when he has the notebook). We could, if we wanted to, sympathize with Light (when he loses memory of the notebook), because it shows us--for really the only time in the entire show--what Light is like without the Death Note, and he's a genuinely good person. Regardless--by the end of the show, countless people have died, including but not limited to: most of Light's family, Light's only friend, one to two women who truly loved Light, and a few honest-to-goodness police officers; and in his dying moments we get to see Light as he reflects upon all of this and realizes just how badly he fucked everything up.

Pan up--passing by the guy who allowed this all to happen literally just because he was "bored" one day--and scene. That's it. That's Death Note. It's not wish-fulfillment; it's a tragedy. It's a character--whom the audience knows to be morally wrong--stacking up a pile of cards upon unstable ground and failing brilliantly as the whole thing collapses.
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Re: Netflix's Death Note Live Action Adaptation

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Postby Ray » Thu Jul 20, 2017 9:32 pm

Ryuk Meets light.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=sFzvJMmH9x0

Okay the rest of the film might be garbage but the scenes with Ryuk look like they could at least make the film worth it.
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Re: Netflix's Death Note Live Action Adaptation

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Postby imprimatur13 » Fri Jul 21, 2017 12:25 am

View Original PostCommanderFish wrote:
SPOILER: Show
The show never tells you to root for him. On the contrary: it shows you how sadistic, evil, manipulative, and uncaring of a guy he is throughout the entire show. And when he thrusts out his whole "new-world" thesis at the end of the show, he is not in any way validated for it. He gets called out as what he is--nothing but a murderer with a God complex--and then proceeds to writhe in a pool of his own blood, pitifully calling for help, while everyone else in the room looks down on him in utter disgust. When L dies, sad music plays. When Light dies, happy music plays. The show could not make it any more obvious in my mind, and it simply baffles me how anyone could interpret it as supporting Light's beliefs in any way.

What Death Note does is it presents us with a very smart young man who comes into contact with absolute power and is corrupted absolutely by it. We are not meant to sympathize with Kira, (or Light when he has the notebook). We could, if we wanted to, sympathize with Light (when he loses memory of the notebook), because it shows us--for really the only time in the entire show--what Light is like without the Death Note, and he's a genuinely good person. Regardless--by the end of the show, countless people have died, including but not limited to: most of Light's family, Light's only friend, one to two women who truly loved Light, and a few honest-to-goodness police officers; and in his dying moments we get to see Light as he reflects upon all of this and realizes just how badly he fucked everything up.

My thoughts exactly. See, to me (I know I'm going OT, but) that's the main difference between Light and Lelouch. Light is a bad guy. He's not likeable. His is a classic story of how absolute power corrupts absolutely. Code Geass is completely different. Lelouch manages not to sell his soul to Geass, and remains a (fairly) good guy, with understandable motivations, right up to the end. He's still a magnificent bastard, and he definitely has a certain... flair, but he is a good guy.
I grew to love Lelouch, and to share his joys and sorrows with him. Death Note is a great story, but they never got that from me. As it says on the back of Vol. 1, it's a suspense story.

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Re: Netflix's Death Note Live Action Adaptation

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Postby CommanderFish » Sat Jul 22, 2017 1:24 am

@imprimatur13, I'm glad to see someone interpret Death Note the same way I do. Unfortunately, I haven't seen Code Geass as of yet so I can't really say much on that matter.


Oh yeah, I sorta forgot this was actually a thread about the new movie.

In regards to that, the aspect of most concern to me is how they're dealing with Light. Namely, it seems to me that he is going to be much less self-motivated in this version, instead having to be egged on to write names by Ryuk (as shown in this new clip) and possibly Misa, or the "new Misa" (based on one of her lines in a trailer). Granted, I don't think this is an inherently negative thing. It's obvious that they're making a lot of changes, probably including a brand-new plot, and I actually prefer this approach opposed to doing a direct adaptation. This is Death Note in America, after all, so I'd think them fools if they were to not take advantage of all the cultural and societal differences this change of setting provides. However, this change in particular has me worried because it could signify that the film is going to try and make Kira sympathetic. The original series never really did this, which made it an easier watch because as a viewer we never had to agree with what Kira was doing, or what L was doing for that matter; we were never coerced into taking the side of one character over another. So, people rooting for Kira and people rooting against Kira were given equal opportunity to become fully invested in the story. If the movie changes this approach, instead giving us a Kira who's designed to be understood, reasoned with and sympathized with as he is slowly transformed by the people around him -- as irrational as it may seem I believe this will actually alienate audiences (namely those who disagree with Kira, myself included), far more than it will invest them.

Of course, the movie's not out yet, and nothing is set in stone. Maybe this Kira will have a completely different ideology, or kill less people, or have some other aspect to his character that makes him fundamentally different than his predecessor. Who knows for sure what they'll do. All I know is that I'm going into it with some caution.
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